The History Of Basketball: The Beginning

The History Of Basketball: The Beginning

Jordyn Fulcher, Writer

The famous sport Basketball was Invented on December 1, 1891, by James Naismith for  Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) Training School In Canada. Naismith created this indoor game for athletes to keep their shape during the winter.
When James Naismith first made Basketball There were 13 rules( that still apply to this day) being: The ball can be thrown in any direction with one or both hands. The ball can be batted in any direction with one or both hands, but never with the fist. A player cannot run with the ball, The player must throw it from the spot on where he catches it. The ball must be held in or between the hand, The arms or body must not be used for holding it. No shouldering, holding, pushing, striking, or tripping an opponent. A foul is striking the ball with the fist. If a side makes three consecutive fouls, it counts as a goal for the opponents. A goal shall be made when the ball is thrown or batted from the ground into the basket and stays there. When the ball goes out of bounds, it shall be thrown into the field and played by the first person touching it. The umpire shall be the judge of the men and shall note the fouls and notify the referee when three consecutive fouls have been made.  The referee shall be the judge of the ball and decide when it is in play in bounds, to which side it belongs, and shall keep the time. The time shall be two 15-minute halves with a five-minute rest between. The side scoring the most goals in that time shall be declared the winner.
On December 21, 1891, Naismith published rules for a new game using five basic ideas and thirteen rules. That day, he asked his class to play a match in the Armory Street court: 9 versus 9, using a soccer ball and two peach baskets. The eighteen players were John G. Thompson, Eugene S. Libby, Edwin P. Ruggles, William R. Chase, T. Duncan Patton, Frank Mahan, Finlay G. MacDonald, William H. Davis, and Lyman Archibald, who defeated George Weller, Wilbert Carey, Ernest Hildner, Raymond Kaighn, Genzabaro Ishikawa, Benjamin S. French, Franklin Barnes, George Day and Henry Gelan 1–0. There were other differences between Naismith’s first idea and the game played today. The peach baskets were closed, and balls had to be retrieved manually until a small hole was put in the bottom of the peach basket to poke the ball out using a stick.